Newquay Activity Centre – Marine Environment Awareness

0

image4Tentacles of the Dahlia anemone – Urticina felina

Newquay Activity Centre were privileged to be invited to the recent Marine Ecology and Conservation Network meeting at Exeter University, in order to better understand and play an active role in the conservation of the environment we use for our activities.

The Marine Ecology and Conservation Network aims to:

bring together key organisations (non-governmental, governmental, private and academic) interested in marine and coastal conservation, both nationally and internationally. We will work to promote the sustainable management of marine and coastal species and habitats by encouraging and facilitating co-ordinated research and conservation activities, building stronger collaborations between member organisations, and sharing information and expertise to improve conservation outcomes.  Although based in the South-West, the network will be concerned with regional, national and global issues.”

For those who believe the waters below our “refreshing”, barren and uninteresting, we hope these photos from a recent research cruise, where a member of our staff explored Cornish reef habitats, will show you UK diversity really does rival that of the tropics!

image1Amazing diversity at a reef habitat in Cornish waters at just 40m depth! Echinus Sea Urchins, Dead Man’s Fingers, Jewel Anemones and even the protected species the Pink Sea Fan.

image2Protected species the Pink Sea Fan – Eunicella verucosa – protected because it acts as a nursery habitat for juveniles in fisheries.

image3A scale worm Polychaete

Some key issues were raised at the conference, where one of the main themes was the devastating effect of plastic pollution on our oceans.

Pictures such as these below were extremely thought-provoking, and Newquay Activity Centre enjoyed being actively involved in debates about tackling this global issue on a local scale.

image5 Painfully long-term effects of a plastic ring pack on the growth of a turtle.

image6Over 60,000km of discarded nets have been found on just 1 island in the Philippines and turned into household items such as carpet tiles here in the UK!

image7“The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it” Robert Swan – an explorer and the first man to walk to both poles.

All photos taken by Amber Cobley.

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here